Tagged: Jung

Portland Seminar on The Works of Carl Jung

Just announced!

Fall Seminar on the Works of Carl Jung

Wednesdays, August 31–October 5, 20166:308:30 p.m

Tuition: $195

Guide: Satya Doyle Byock

Location: Literary Arts, Portland, Oregon 

Register Here

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“Since it is universally believed that man is merely what his consciousness knows of itself, he regards himself as harmless and so adds stupidity to iniquity. He does not deny that terrible things have happened and still go on happening, but it is always ‘the others’ who do them…we prefer to localize evil in individual criminals or groups or criminals, while washing our hands in innocence and ignoring the general proclivity to evil. This sanctimoniousness cannot be kept up in the long run, because the evil, as experience shows, lies in man.”

What Carl Jung wrote in the wake of WWII and the atomic age remains no less relevant today, as racial and political division and violence plague our society. Following the sold-out seminar on Jung’s Red Book, this Delve will explore a collection of Jung’s essays on topics such as ethics, good and evil, the psychological value of dreams, marriage as a psychological relationship, synchronicity, and much more.

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The Inner World of the First Half of Life: journal article on Jung’s work and young adulthood

IMG_9227I am delighted to share the recent publication of my article “The Inner World of the First Half of Life: Analytical Psychology’s Forgotten Developmental Stage,” in the Winter issue of Psychological Perspectives, published by The Los Angeles Jung Institute.

This article addresses the lack of attention paid to the stage of early adulthood within Jungian psychology, and why that neglect harms both communities. The article also begins to outline some of what individuals in their 20s (give-or-take) are experiencing today, through a Jungian lens.

 

Click here to download a free PDF of the approved, un-formatted article.

Abstract:

IMG_9221The field of analytical psychology has largely ignored the developmental stage that Jung termed the “first half of life.” As a result, a great many individuals coming of age today, starving for guidance on how to live in relationship to their inner lives, find little that reflects them within the Jungian literature or community. This article addresses that issue, identifying some of the challenges that individuals in the first half of life face today, including the lack of traditional supports to guide their transition from childhood into adulthood, and the popularly termed “quarter-life crisis” that often marks this stage. This article also questions the assumptions within the field that tie individuation to the second half of life, and it explores the relationship with the inner world that is possible earlier in life.