“I’m Driving My Car and I Can’t Slow Down.” A Dream Interpretation.

Dear Satya:

Q: I have had several dreams in which I am driving and I can’t slow down. Sometimes I run red lights, sometimes I am driving and I cannot figure out how to use the brakes. I am usually very scared but I somehow manage to stay in control of the car.

A: Unfortunately, this is a very common dream theme, but it’s one that is indicative of a cultural illness of manic activity. The message from the dream is clear: you need to slow down. You may even think that you have already slowed things down in your life. If so, the dream is saying “try harder.” This is your own unconscious giving you a very clear message. Listen.

Cars in dreams are symbolic of you. They’re like turtles’ shells, the additional homes or bodies in which we travel through the world. If you have dreams of driving, pay attention. Pay attention to the way in which you are driving, or if you are driving at all. If you’re not driving, who is? Who’s in the driver’s seat? This is very important information. You can develop great insight into what aspect of you is actually in control of your life, or perhaps it’s another person in your life altogether.

Your dreams are indicating that you are holding onto control by the skin of your teeth. You may think “but I’m killing it right now! I’m totally in control of things!” If that is the case, this dream is clearly indicating another layer of what is going on, that perhaps you’re riding on a degree of mania, feeling on top of it while actually beginning to crash (pun intended). While you are safe for now, you don’t really know how you’re managing it. After a while, you’ll start to pay the price if you don’t heed the advice of your dream.

Dreams are often the first line of defense in getting us into alignment with our inner selves. If we’re checked-out or disengaged from our path in life, our dreams will reflect that. Sometimes, they’ll turn into nightmares to get our attention. But if our awareness gets too fragmented, we can fall into physical danger too: we forget to look both ways when crossing the street, we stop paying close attention when driving our car in waking life, maybe we just get angry with people in our lives when we needn’t be. It’s also possible that following these dreams, an injury or illness may appear to slow us down by force. This may again be what the dream is reflecting directly, with the car representing the body. Take a good look at your immune system, your sleep habits, your eating, and your physical well-being.

Your dreamworld is your ally. If your dream is telling you to slow down, it’s not demanding something you cannot accomplish. Find a way to spend more time alone, to breath, to stay aware of the moment-to-moment details in your life. Bringing yourself into the moment of whatever it is you may be doing will significantly slow down your internal clock and pace. You’ll be the better for it.

Have you had a dream like this? Leave a comment and share!

Satya is a psychotherapist in private practice in Portland, Oregon specializing in dream work, the quarter-life crisis, and work with individuals in their 20s and 30s. www.QuarterLifeCounselor.com

Seminar on Joseph Campbell and the Hero’s Journey

Join me this October at Portland’s Literary Arts to explore Joseph Campbell and the Hero’s Journey:

Joseph Campbell & Richard Wright: The Hero’s Journey and the Modern Memoir
Saturdays, October 4 – November 8, 2014 10:30am – 12:30pm
Tuition: $185

picture-360Mythologist Joseph Campbell broke open the esoteric imagery of world mythology with his insight into the “monomyth”, an overarching storyline found in cultures across the globe that he called the Hero’s Journey. Campbell’s work drew upon Carl Jung’s discovery of the archetypal unconscious and illuminates how ancient stories reflect individual life experiences, and vice versa.

Richard-Wright1In this seminar, we’ll explore the Hero’s Journey and how it is reflected in a modern memoir. We will begin with Joseph Campbell’s seminal work The Hero with a Thousand Faces and then explore the extraordinary 1945 literary memoir Black Boy, by Richard Wright, about growing up black in the American South at the turn of the 20th century.

Guide: Satya Doyle Byock is a psychotherapist in private practice, specializing in the psychology of Carl Jung. She is perpetually compelled by the way the personal narrative and the mythological narrative intertwine.

Visit Literary Arts to learn more and sign up!